Home
   Trade Dollars

Antiques & collectibles
from A to Z!©

A

Advertising

Art Deco

Art Nouveau

B

Barware
  Bar Sets & Accessories
  Decanters
  Shakers & Pitchers
  Bar Glasses
  Shots & Jiggers

Baskets

Belmont Stakes glasses

Books

Brass Bird Cages

Breeders’ Cup glasses

Brushes

C

Cartography

China & Dinnerware

Collectibles
  Beanie Babies
     Bears & Bunnies
     Cats & Critters
     Dogs
     Horses
  Exonumia
  Glasses
     Blakely cactus
     U.S. States
     U.S. Destinations
  Looney Tunes
  Mugs
  Music Boxes
  Pinbacks
  Pin Trays
  Plates
     DeGrazia
       The DeGrazia story
     Miscellaneous
  Sad Irons
  Spoons
     Commemorative
     U.S. States
     U.S. Cities
     International
     Zodiac
     Miscellaneous
  Whiskey
     Jim Beam
     Maker’s Mark
       Maker’s Mark story
     Miscellaneous

Computer Games
  Kids
  Teens
  Mature

Computer Software

Corning Ware
   Cornflower Blue
   Spice of Life
   Lids & Accessories
   The Corning Ware Story
   Corning Ware Patterns
   Corning Ware Blog

Cowboy Stuff
   Old West Magazine
     The Old West Story
   Frontier Times Magazine
   True West Magazine
   Glassware
   Miscellaneous

F

Flatware
  Bakelite
  Sterling Silver
  Silver Plate
  Stainless Steel

G

Gal Stuff
  Vanity Items
  Vintage Purses
  Purse Frames
  Vintage Hats
  Folding Fans
  Perfume Bottles

Gay Fad
  Gay Fad book
  Sets
  Singles
  Souvenir Glasses
  Gay Fad Era
  Gay Fad Blog

Gifts
  Wedding
  Housewarming

Glass
  Brilliant Cut
  Elegant/Pressed
  Antique/Vintage
  Art Glass
  Carnival Glass
  Milk Glass
  Ruby Glass
  Etched/Frosted
  Bottles
  Jars
  Fruit Jars
  Salt Dips
  Insulators
  Drinking Glasses

Guy Stuff
  Cars
  Motorcycles
  Gas Pump Dispensers
  Trains, Planes, Ships
  Neckties

H

Horse Racing
  Belmont Stakes - see “B” listings above
  Breeders’ Cup - see “B” listings above
  Kentucky Derby - see “K” listings below
  Preakness Stakes - see “P” listings below

K

Kentucky Derby
   1940s Glasses
   1950s Glasses
   1960s Glasses
   1970s Glasses
   1980s Glasses
   1990s Glasses
   2000-2009 Glasses
   2010-present Glasses
   Super Rare Glasses
   Beanie Babies
   Coffee Mugs
   Julep Cups
   Memorabilia
   Shots & Jiggers
  
Kentucky Derby Festival
 

Kitchen Stuff
  Anchor Hocking
  Cast Iron Cookware
     The Griswold story
  Coffee Mugs
  Coffee Pots, etc.
  Cookware
  Kitchen Gadgets
  Metalware
  Plasticware
  Pyrex
  Salts & Peppers
  Spoon Rests
  Tupperware
  Vintage Glass

L

Lamps & Lighting

Louisville Stoneware
  Mugs
  Julep Glasses
  Cool Stuff

M

Metalware
  Aluminum
  Brass
  Cast Iron
  Chrome
  Copper
  Silver Plate
  Sterling Silver
  Tins & Tinware
   Advertising Tins
   Other Tins, etc.
  Miscellaneous

Mexico Treasures
  Metalware
  Pottery
  Folk Art

Music
   JM Talbot

N

Native Americana
  Hopi Kachinas
  Virgil Long Kachina
   Collection
  Hopi Rattles
  Jewelry

O

Office Stuff

P

Preakness Stakes glasses

Porcelain & Pottery
  Marked
     Six Degrees of Separation
  Unmarked
  Orientalia
  Art Pottery
  Crocks
  Jugs
  Stoneware

S

Singer Sewing
  Machine

T

Textiles
  Hankies
  Sheets, etc.
  Miscellaneous

Tobacciana
  Ashtrays
  Trading Cards

U

Useful Stuff

V

View-Master
  Viewers & boxes
  3-reel sets
   Children
   Cities & States - US
   Disney
   National Parks - US
   Religious
   Travel - U.S.
   Travel - International
   TV & Movies
   Miscellaneous
  Single reels
   Animals
   Children
   Cities - US
   Disney
   Flowers & Plants
   History
   National Parks - US
   Religious
   States - US
   Travel - US
   Travel - International
   TV / Movies
  Collector reels
  Out of Print reels
  Literature
  View-Master Story
   Glory Years
   Transition
   Toyland

W

Wood

Crocks

James Keiller & Son Dundee marmalade crock

According to the black transferware advertising on its front, this old 4-3/8" tall x 3” diameter cream-colored stoneware crock once contained “1lb. net” of Dundee Marmalade, “Made in Dundee Scotland by James Keiller & Son Ltd.” James Keiller (1775-1839) established his company in 1797 and is credited with introducing (as opposed to inventing) marmalade as a commercial product at the start of the 19th century. Amazingly enough, the company is still in business today! I’ve seen several of these Dundee crocks for sale, always white, not cream-colored, with various wording on them, and the sellers always claim the crocks date from the late 1800's. Ours certainly looks like it’s that old, but it’s not older than 1873, because the words above the leaf mark say “Grand Medal of Merit Vienna 1873". The unglazed bottom is inscribed: “Pot Made in England”. Whatever its precise age, this little crock has already lived a very long life and has lots of character to show for it: plenty of discoloration and crazing, and three old hairline cracks extending half way down its side. It’s a really neat old piece! (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $30.00 + s/h and insurance

 

  only 1 available

 

Small white stoneware crock

This 4-1/2" tall x 3" diameter white stoneware crock has no advertising on it, but may have been made by the same unnamed English pottery works that made the Dundee crock listed above. Its unglazed bottom has a very faint inscription that may well be “Pot Made in England”. It is exactly the same shape, including the incised ring near the rim, and almost exactly the same size as the Dundee crock, but, based on its condition, I doubt it’s quite as old. It has very minor wear at both the top and bottom, and one small scratch on its interior. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $15.00 + s/h and insurance

** SOLD **

 

Huge white lidded crock

This huge heavy white stoneware crock stands 9-1/4" tall and has a 7-1/2" diameter mouth. The sides then slope outward to 9-1/4" diameter at the bottom of the “handles”, going straight down from there to the unglazed unmarked bottom. This crock’s only decoration is a raised 3/8" band encircling it below the “handles”, and two smaller raised bands encircling it above them. The lid is a 3/4" thick piece of unfinished circular wood, to which a white ceramic knob with a colorful flower design on top has been attached with a screw. I have no idea whether this is the original lid. The “handles” have holes that suggest an original bail mechanism. Undoubtedly vintage, probably near-antique, this crock has plenty of dark spots and crazing that makes for a very attractive rustic appearance. There’s a diagonal 1/2" cut mark about 2" from the bottom of one handle that’s smooth enough to the touch to be either a very old scratch or a knife slip that occurred when this crock was made. The glaze has chipped or worn away at several places on the bottom rim, but there’s only one chip to the crock itself: a 1/2" x 1" one at the base that wraps around to the bottom. All in all, a wonderful addition to anyone’s crockery collection. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $85.00 + s/h and insurance

 

  only 1 available

 

Large dark brown crock

This large old straight-sided dark brown crock stands 7-3/4" tall, is 7-1/2" in diameter at its rim, and 7" in diameter at its base. The shiny very dark brown exterior has a pebbly texture and appearance, with plenty of glaze flaws and bumps. The brown color has chipped away at the tops of several of these, or maybe they’re just glaze pops. The top rim is unglazed, as is the unmarked bottom. Quite good condition, considering its age. No cracks, but wear and minor chipping to the interior and around both the bottom and top. However, there is only one “real” chip at the interior rim. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $55.00

 

  only 1 available

 

Huge dark brown crock

If you’re looking for a “statement” piece, let this huge old straight-sided dark brown crock bellow his presence! (At this size and weight, of course he’s a he!) He stands 10" tall, is 9-3/4" in diameter edge-to-edge of his 3/4" thick rim, and 9-1/4" in diameter at his base! He is shiny dark brown in color, with a slightly lighter brown “drape” on one side, above which are dark brown drips. He looks like he’s always been a fighter, not a lover, because he has plenty of exterior scuffs, dings, and bumps, plus one old scar (crack) that runs over his unglazed beveled rim and diagonally down about 2" inside and 3" outside. That must have been some fight! (Wonder what the other guy looks like?) His bottom is unglazed and unmarked except for a roughly inscribed “5" at one edge and the remnants of what might originally have been a companion “5". Considering his age and apparent pugilistic history, he’s in remarkably good condition, with only very minor wear around either his top or bottom, and he’s obviously ready to continue fighting the good fight for another century or so! Trust me, you really want this guy in your corner! (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $70.00 + s/h and insurance

 

  only 1 available

 

Small brown crock #1

If you like the distressed look, you’ll love this little dark brown stoneware crock. At only 2-1/2" tall and 4-7/8" in diameter, it was probably a butter crock that went on to other uses and became naturally distressed over the years, as you can see from the photos. Lots of chips, but no cracks or crazing. Both the rim and the unmarked bottom are unglazed. Unknown age, but clearly vintage. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $10.00 + s/h and insurance

 

  only 1 available

 

Small brown crock #2

Here’s another naturally distressed dark brown stoneware crock. In fact, it looks like it could have been made at the same time and by the same folks who made the RWS stoneware bowl listed in our Stoneware category. The rough style and technique are quite similar, as is the “beveled” rim and the “drippy” glaze pattern, but this crock is unmarked on its unglazed bottom, and has a fully glazed interior. Except, of course, for all the little nicks that could be glaze pops or could be wear. Who knows?? It stands 3-1/8" high and is 4-1/2" in diameter. The glazing around the top is quite uneven, which I suppose could come from wear, but actually looks more like an original primitive glazing technique. There are two definite chips, not flaws, at the base, and a definite glaze pop 1-1/4" down from the rim. Again, quite a unique piece that I’m betting is waaaaay vintage if not actually a true antique. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $15.00 + s/h and insurance

** SOLD **

Large salt glaze crock

This big ol’ salt glaze crock stands 8" tall with diameters of 8-1/4" at its rolled mouth and 7-3/4" at its unmarked bottom. Its exterior is a rich tan color with lots of brown and black speckles and mottling while its ribbed interior is deep chocolate brown with tan speckles and splotches (called Albany slip). By the way, I came across a fascinating article that thoroughly explains salt glazing, Albany slip, and just about everything else you’d ever want to know about stoneware (plus a whole bunch of other things). Quoting from An Archaeological Guide to Historic Artifacts of the Upper Sangamon Basin published by Parkland College in Champaign, Illinois:

Salt glazing was a simple technique. Common salt was thrown into the kiln as the object was being fired. Vaporizing, it condensed on the ware as a very thin film of glassy silicate. The distinctive surface is clear and shiny, but textured like orange peel. The color of the vessel will reflect the amount of iron present in the clay and the concentration of oxygen in the firing atmosphere. In the most basic expression the interiors were left unglazed. Equally common, however, were interiors treated with yellow-green lead or dark brown Albany slip glazes. All three forms were popular throughout the nineteenth century, although salt glazed became less common after the 1860's.
Albany slip was a hard, chocolate brown glaze produced by natural clays. The clay was mixed as a watery slurry into which the vessel was dipped. Familiar applications were to the interior only, the exterior only (or just part of the exterior), or to both surfaces. The clay was first extracted from loci near Albany, New York, but was widely produced in the Mid-west during the last three-quarters of the nineteenth century. It became less common after 1910.

With its salt glaze exterior and Albany slip interior, our crock may well be a true antique and certainly has a delightfully primitive appearance. It’s in excellent condition with no nicks or chips. Several old shallow and discolored hairline cracks on one side give added character and are downright decorative! (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $85.00 + s/h and insurance

 

  only 1 available

 

You are on page 2 of 2 pages in this category. 1 2

Tell a friend about the neat item you found above:

Tell a friend:
 

 

Santa Fe Trading Post

swaphos@santafetradingpost.com

© 2000-2016 Santa Fe Trading Post™ All Rights Reserved.
All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
 

Click here to see our latest arrivals here at the
Trading Post

Just Looking??
Be our guest!
Click here

We get many wonderful emails from our Trading Post visitors and thought you might enjoy reading some of them, too. Click here!

  • R01
  • R81
  • R03
  • R04
  • R82
  • R83
  • R84
  • R85
  • R09
  • R10
 

  • R11
  • R12
  • R86
  • R14
  • R87
  • R16
  • R88
  • R18
  • R19
  • R20
 

  • R95
  • R91
  • R23
  • R94
  • R89
  • R90
  • R27
  • R92
  • R93
  • R30
 

  • R31
  • R32
  • R96
  • R34
  • R97
  • R36
  • R98
  • R38
  • R39
  • R40
 

  • R41
  • R42
  • R99
  • R44
  • R100
  • R46
  • R47
  • R101
  • R49
  • R50
 

  • R51
  • R102
  • R53
  • R104
  • R103
  • R56
  • R57
  • R58
  • R105
  • R106
 

  • R61
  • R107
  • R63
  • R68
  • R65
  • R66
  • R67
  • R109
  • R110
  • R70
 

  • R71
  • R72
  • R111
  • R112
  • R75
  • R113
  • R114
  • R115
  • R79
  • R80