Home
   Trade Dollars

Antiques & collectibles
from A to Z!©

A

Advertising

Art Deco

Art Nouveau

B

Barware
  Bar Sets & Accessories
  Decanters
  Shakers & Pitchers
  Bar Glasses
  Shots & Jiggers

Baskets

Belmont Stakes glasses

Books

Brass Bird Cages

Breeders’ Cup glasses

Brushes

C

Cartography

China & Dinnerware

Collectibles
  Beanie Babies
     Bears & Bunnies
     Cats & Critters
     Dogs
     Horses
  Exonumia
  Glasses
     Blakely cactus
     U.S. States
     U.S. Destinations
  Looney Tunes
  Mugs
  Music Boxes
  Pinbacks
  Pin Trays
  Plates
     DeGrazia
       The DeGrazia story
     Miscellaneous
  Sad Irons
  Spoons
     Commemorative
     U.S. States
     U.S. Cities
     International
     Zodiac
     Miscellaneous
  Whiskey
     Jim Beam
     Maker’s Mark
       Maker’s Mark story
     Miscellaneous

Computer Games
  Kids
  Teens
  Mature

Computer Software

Corning Ware
   Cornflower Blue
   Spice of Life
   Lids & Accessories
   The Corning Ware Story
   Corning Ware Patterns
   Corning Ware Blog

Cowboy Stuff
   Old West Magazine
     The Old West Story
   Frontier Times Magazine
   True West Magazine
   Glassware
   Miscellaneous

F

Flatware
  Bakelite
  Sterling Silver
  Silver Plate
  Stainless Steel

G

Gal Stuff
  Vanity Items
  Vintage Purses
  Purse Frames
  Vintage Hats
  Folding Fans
  Perfume Bottles

Gay Fad
  Gay Fad book
  Sets
  Singles
  Souvenir Glasses
  Gay Fad Era
  Gay Fad Blog

Gifts
  Wedding
  Housewarming

Glass
  Brilliant Cut
  Elegant/Pressed
  Antique/Vintage
  Art Glass
  Carnival Glass
  Milk Glass
  Ruby Glass
  Etched/Frosted
  Bottles
  Jars
  Fruit Jars
  Salt Dips
  Insulators
  Drinking Glasses

Guy Stuff
  Cars
  Motorcycles
  Gas Pump Dispensers
  Trains, Planes, Ships
  Neckties

H

Horse Racing
  Belmont Stakes - see “B” listings above
  Breeders’ Cup - see “B” listings above
  Kentucky Derby - see “K” listings below
  Preakness Stakes - see “P” listings below

K

Kentucky Derby
   1940s Glasses
   1950s Glasses
   1960s Glasses
   1970s Glasses
   1980s Glasses
   1990s Glasses
   2000-2009 Glasses
   2010-present Glasses
   Super Rare Glasses
   Beanie Babies
   Coffee Mugs
   Julep Cups
   Memorabilia
   Shots & Jiggers
  
Kentucky Derby Festival
 

Kitchen Stuff
  Anchor Hocking
  Cast Iron Cookware
     The Griswold story
  Coffee Mugs
  Coffee Pots, etc.
  Cookware
  Kitchen Gadgets
  Metalware
  Plasticware
  Pyrex
  Salts & Peppers
  Spoon Rests
  Tupperware
  Vintage Glass

L

Lamps & Lighting

Louisville Stoneware
  Mugs
  Julep Glasses
  Cool Stuff

M

Metalware
  Aluminum
  Brass
  Cast Iron
  Chrome
  Copper
  Silver Plate
  Sterling Silver
  Tins & Tinware
   Advertising Tins
   Other Tins, etc.
  Miscellaneous

Mexico Treasures
  Metalware
  Pottery
  Folk Art

Music
   JM Talbot

N

Native Americana
  Hopi Kachinas
  Virgil Long Kachina
   Collection
  Hopi Rattles
  Jewelry

O

Office Stuff

P

Preakness Stakes glasses

Porcelain & Pottery
  Marked
     Six Degrees of Separation
  Unmarked
  Orientalia
  Art Pottery
  Crocks
  Jugs
  Stoneware

S

Singer Sewing
  Machine

T

Textiles
  Hankies
  Sheets, etc.
  Miscellaneous

Tobacciana
  Ashtrays
  Trading Cards

U

Useful Stuff

V

View-Master
  Viewers & boxes
  3-reel sets
   Children
   Cities & States - US
   Disney
   National Parks - US
   Religious
   Travel - U.S.
   Travel - International
   TV & Movies
   Miscellaneous
  Single reels
   Animals
   Children
   Cities - US
   Disney
   Flowers & Plants
   History
   National Parks - US
   Religious
   States - US
   Travel - US
   Travel - International
   TV / Movies
  Collector reels
  Out of Print reels
  Literature
  View-Master Story
   Glory Years
   Transition
   Toyland

W

Wood

Mexican Pottery

Rosa L. Mata Ortiz olla

This lovely little olla (pronounced O-ya, Spanish for “pot”) is an example of the classic Paquime style of Mexican pottery often called Mata Ortiz pottery. But before telling you more about it, I’ve got to tell you the story of Mata Ortiz pottery.

It all began with Juan Quezada, a 12-year old boy living in Mata Ortiz, a poor village in northern Chihuahua, Mexico. Mata Ortiz was built near the ruins of Paquime, ancient city of the Casas Grandes (“Big Houses”) culture, so named for their town’s main adobe structure that soared six stories above the surrounding plains. As with the ancient Anasazis of what is now the Four Corners area of America’s desert southwest, the Casas Grandes disappeared over 600 years ago, leaving behind only pottery fragments to bear witness to their level of artistry and sophistication. Often when Juan Quezada was out gathering firewood for his family he found old pottery shards that intrigued him. He kept them, studied them, and began to wonder if he might not be able to reproduce such pottery.
But in Chihuahua, pottery making was a lost art and Juan was completely untaught and unskilled. Nevertheless, he began experimenting with various amounts of the different clays found in the mountains near Mata Ortiz, as well as with different materials needed to make pigments for painting. Through pure trial and error, plus an undoubtedly extraordinary intuition and artistic soul, Juan soon taught himself how to make ollas similar to those of the ancient Paquime Indians, formed and painted entirely by hand, without benefit of a potter’s wheel or kiln. He even invented his own technique for firing the pieces, using cow manure as the combustible!
Several years passed and neither Juan Quezada nor his remarkable ollas might ever have been known outside of Mata Ortiz except for a highly improbable chain of events that should bring goosebumps to anyone who has ever pondered that which we call “fate.” One day, for whatever reason, some visitors ventured into Mata Ortiz and Juan, for whatever reason, gave them three of his ollas. These they ultimately exchanged for clothing at Bob’s Swap Shop in Deming, New Mexico.
Enter Spencer MacCallum, an American anthropologist with a specialty in Art History, who walked into Bob’s Swap Shop one day in 1976, bought the three ollas for $18 apiece, and then, recognizing their artistry and true value, set about discovering who had made them. Ultimately he wound up in Mata Ortiz, where an astounded Juan Quezada surely must have thought he was meeting the “gringo loco” of all time when MacCallum offered to pay him a generous monthly stipend to produce his art full-time, for which MacCallum would endeavor to develop an American market!
And the rest really is history. Due to MacCallum’s promotion, originally in the American Southwest, the demand for Mata Ortiz pottery quickly skyrocketed. Wanting to help others in his village become successful potters, too, Juan Quezada taught his techniques first to his family and then to other members of his community. Thirty years later, over 400 local artists are involved in this artistic movement, the community’s economic level has increased incredibly, and Mata Ortiz ollas are recognized worldwide. Many pieces have been exhibited in important museums and galleries, and in 1999 the Mexican government awarded Juan Quezada the Premio Nacional de los Artes, the highest honor Mexico can give a living artist.

Our beautiful little olla was purchased in New Mexico around 1982. The clay is a rich tan-brown, painted with deep gray geometric designs, three filled with dusty red, three with the same deep gray. Very graceful in shape, this olla stands 4-3/4" tall with diameters of 3" at the rolled mouth and approximately 6-1/2" at its widest point. Excellent condition with no nicks, chips, cracks, or crazing, and only one small scratch on the bottom that’s marked “Rosa L.” Thinking it might be an early example of the work of Rosa Loya, one of the first Mata Ortiz potters, we contacted Spencer MacCallum to see if he could verify that. Here is his gracious response:

Dear Swaphos and Miss Kitty,
Well, you have a mystery! The pot is not by any of the Loya or Ledezma families. I talked with them, and they disclaim any knowledge of it. Rosa Loya (Rosa Isela Loya Jaquez de Ledezma) has always signed her pots “Rosa Loya” or “Rosa Loya y Santos Ledezma” (Santos Ledezma Gonzalez is her husband), never just “Rosa L.” Moreover, they don’t work in the classic Paquime style; their style is very different.
Thinking it might have been made not in Mata Ortiz, but in Nuevo Casas Grandes by one of Julian Hernandez’ students, I called Julian, but he doesn’t know a Rosa L. He thinks it’s likely by a relative of Gaby Silveira in Porvenir, or could have been made by one of the Manuel Olivas family here in Casas Grandes. Do you want me to pursue it further? It’s a simple design, but well done.
Spencer

We don’t yet know the identity of Rosa L., but obviously she’s a skilled potter. Her graceful little olla is truly a work of art to be treasured and passed down through the generations. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $115.00 + s/h and insurance

 

   only 1 available

 

Tonala fruit plate

In Tonala, Mexico, a small town on the outskirts of Guadalajara in the State of Jalisco, the history of pottery dates back to pre-Hispanic times. Tonala artisans make, paint, and polish their pieces by hand. This 11-1/4" diameter x 1-1/4" deep wall plate is representative of the brunido style of Tonala pottery, hand burnished with stones or pyrite to produce a shiny appearance. The central design is of a large peach surrounded by cherries and grapes, with a border of additional cherries, all done in vibrant shades of red, blue, green, and yellow. Back is signed by the artist E. Ortiz, and shows an unglazed red clay base ring. Above the artist’s signature is a hole for inserting a hanger so the plate may be hung on a wall. Beautifully done and in perfect condition with no nicks, chips, or cracks. See our companion Tonala plate listed immediately below. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $35.00 + s/h and insurance

 

   only 1 available

 

Tonala pear plate

This 11-1/4" diameter x 1-1/8" deep Tonala wall plate features a central design of three green pears, surrounded by a blue and yellow border. Unsigned on the back, two holes pierce the unglazed red clay base ring so a hanger may be inserted to hang the plate on a wall. This plate coordinates well with our companion Tonala plate listed immediately above, and this one, too is beautifully done and in perfect condition with no nicks, chips, or cracks. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $35.00 + s/h and insurance

 

   only 1 available

 

Blue and white pottery duck

I don’t know for sure that this lovely blue and white duck was made in Mexico, but he certainly has that Mexican look about him with his brilliant colors, particularly the deep blue of his head and deep orange of his bill and eyes, and the overlapping semicircular design of his feathers that I’ve seen on other Mexican pottery pieces. Measuring 6-1/2" long x 3" wide at its widest point x 4" tall, he rests on his unglazed 1-3/4" x 3-3/4" ovular base. Unmarked as to maker and in perfect condition with no nicks, chips, or cracks. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $20.00 + s/h and insurance

 

   only 1 available

 

Pair of primitive angel bells

This is a pair of primitive Mexican folk art angel bells. Roughly hewn and completely undecorated, these bells are examples of the ancient technique of hand-forming pottery from gray clay and then smoking it to produce an even deeper gray patina. The angels’ facial features are simple and undetailed and their robes have all the “imperfections” associated with this primitive style of pottery. The clappers are attached by string wound around the angels’ waists. One clapper is a metal nut and the other is a lump of clay. One bell is 3" in diameter, the other is 3-1/4" in diameter, and both are approximately 4" tall. One retains its original interior sticker saying “Mexico.” Both bells are in excellent vintage condition. One has a hairline slit rising up from its base and it’s impossible to tell whether this is a “manufacturing flaw” or an old crack. It doesn’t affect the bell’s beauty or functionality, and in fact adds character and authenticity. These one-of-a-kind angel bells are unique additions to anyone’s collection. (Click on picture for more images.) Tell a friend.

Price: $55.00 + s/h and insurance

 

   only 1 pair available

 

Tell a friend about the neat item you found above:

Tell a friend:
 

 

Santa Fe Trading Post

swaphos@santafetradingpost.com

© 2000-2016 Santa Fe Trading Post™ All Rights Reserved.
All other copyrights and trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
 

Click here to see our latest arrivals here at the
Trading Post

Just Looking??
Be our guest!
Click here

We get many wonderful emails from our Trading Post visitors and thought you might enjoy reading some of them, too. Click here!

  • R01
  • R81
  • R03
  • R04
  • R82
  • R83
  • R84
  • R85
  • R09
  • R10
 

  • R11
  • R12
  • R86
  • R14
  • R87
  • R16
  • R88
  • R18
  • R19
  • R20
 

  • R95
  • R91
  • R23
  • R94
  • R89
  • R90
  • R27
  • R92
  • R93
  • R30
 

  • R31
  • R32
  • R96
  • R34
  • R97
  • R36
  • R98
  • R38
  • R39
  • R40
 

  • R41
  • R42
  • R99
  • R44
  • R100
  • R46
  • R47
  • R101
  • R49
  • R50
 

  • R51
  • R102
  • R53
  • R104
  • R103
  • R56
  • R57
  • R58
  • R105
  • R106
 

  • R61
  • R107
  • R63
  • R68
  • R65
  • R66
  • R67
  • R109
  • R110
  • R70
 

  • R71
  • R72
  • R111
  • R112
  • R75
  • R113
  • R114
  • R115
  • R79
  • R80